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Why Solder Your Wedding Rings?

Posted Thursday, June 01, 2017

So, you just got married and now you have two rings—an engagement ring and a wedding band—on the fourth finger of your left hand. While some wives choose to keep these rings separate, doing so can lead to both rings becoming damaged. Due to the friction caused by the two rings rubbing and scraping against each other over time, the intricate details of each ring can easily wear out, gradually transforming a clean and beautiful design into a marred and lackluster one.

The best and most common way to protect these two important investments is to solder them together. Generally speaking, soldering is the process by which two metal items become joined together through melting down and adding a filler metal—or solder—into the joint between the two. The filler metal has a lower melting point than the two metal items being joined, so the structure of these two items remains unchanged. This is what separates soldering from welding, a process by which two metal items are joined by being melted together. Believe us, you don’t want to weld your engagement ring to your wedding band!

By soldering your two rings into one with a delicate, yet solid bond, you are choosing to preserve their beauty and quality for years to come. (In addition to preserving these things, it’s simply easier and more functional to wear one "ring” as opposed to two.) When joining your two rings together, be sure that the soldering process meets the following important criteria: 

  1. Proper fit: both rings having equal inside diameters
  2. Proper alignment: both rings maintain their individual artistic quality
  3. Proper amount: the rings are bonded together at two points
  4. Proper spacing: the bond should give the appearance of two separate rings
  5. Proper quality: joining the rings with a lasting, professional-level bond 
Soldering your engagement ring and your wedding band together is a wise choice. Doing so will enable you and your spouse—as well as future generations—to enjoy your rings as they currently are. Just as you would choose to work hard to preserve your marriage, so, too, you should choose to work hard to preserve the rings symbolizing that marriage.


By Lesa Catt
My name is Lesa, owner at Gold Definitions Inc. and I would love to share my personal story with you. I have been fortunate to do what I love for over 26 years, a bench jeweler (jewelry repair). I completed my jewelry repair training in 7 years—setting stones and refurbishing worn jewelry to make it look brand new again.

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